Reprints

Reprints 1-12 are Twelve Separate Papers by Alvin Hamblen Morrison, about French-English-Wabanaki Frontier Encounters, here below collectively titled as:

DAWNLAND DYNAMICS:
Evolving Encounters on the Wabanaki Frontier

All 12 Reprinted from Papers of the Algonquian* Conferences (published academically in Canada between 1975 and 1998), and arranged here not by date of publication, but by basic subject, in Three Categorical Parts:

PART 1: INTRODUCTION

(Reprint 1) DAWNLAND DIASPORA: Wabanaki Dynamics For Survival.
Go to Reprint 1 Introduction


(Reprint 2) PENOBSCOT COUNTRY: Disagreement Over Who Lived There In The 17th Century Needs Resolving – If Possible.
Go to Reprint 2 Introduction

PART 2: ADAPTIVE WABANAKI LEADERSHIP & LEADERS

(Reprint 3) DAWNLAND DIRECTORS: Status & Role Of 17th-Century Wabanaki Sagamores.
Go to Reprint 3


(Reprint 4) DAWNLAND DIRECTORS’ DECISIONS: An Outline Of 17th-Century Encounter Dynamics On The Wabanaki Frontier.
Go to Reprint 4


(Reprint 5) MEMBERTOU’S RAID ON THE CHOUACOET “ALMOUCHIQUOIS”: The Micmac Sack Of Saco In 1607.
Go to Reprint 5


(Reprint 6) THE CASE OF THE SLANDERED(?) SAGAMORE: Ouagimou Of The St-Croix River.
Go to Reprint 6


(Reprint 7) WABANAKI WOMEN EXTRAORDINAIRE: A Sampler From Fact And Fancy.
Go to Reprint 7

PART 3: EVOLVING WHITE PERCEPTIONS & LITERARY IMAGES

(Reprint 8) ANGLO-WABANAKI RELATIONS 1605-1630.
Go to Reprint 8


(Reprint 9) DAWNLAND DOG-FEAST: Wabanaki Warfare & Slavery c1600-c1760.
Go to Reprint 9


(Reprint 10) THE WABANAKI IN CHILDREN’S LITERATURE: Some Preliminary Comments.
Go to Reprint 10


(Reprint 11) THE WABANAKI IN 19th-CENTURY AMERICAN LITERATURE: Some Examples Of How They Fared.
Go to Reprint 11


(Reprint 12) THE WABANAKI IN WHITE LITERATURE: Some Further Comments.
Go to Reprint 12


*Algonquian is the very widespread generic Language Family, within which are many peoples-&-languages, including the Wabanaki Group consisting of three specific closely-related-but-separate peoples-&-languages (each language having dialects). These three languages are herein called Micmac, Maliseet-Passamaquoddy, and Penobscot-Abenaki-Pennacook.

SECTION 3

Wabanaki Territories ca. 1600
Wabanaki Territories ca. 1725

Preprint 1